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environment. he met his brazilian counterpart. brazil has been experiencing high growth ahead of the 2014 world cup and the summer olympics. buff the number of japanese firms operating there hasn't increased over the years. one reason is that the tax system is too complicated. he's asking the brazilian government to review it and look at other changes that could improve the business environment. japan is viewed as an important trade partner. he indicated that the tax burden on brazilian companies is similar to that of foreign firms. >>> people looking for work in the united states are seeing improvements. the latest figures show employers added more jobs than expected in april. and the unemployment rate hit more than a four year low. u.s. labor department spokespersons say the unemployment rate last month was 7.5%. that's down 0.1 percentage points. employers added 165,000 jobs in the nonfarm sector. analysts had expected about 150,000. employment opportunities increased in professional and business services and health care and places where people eat and drink. payroll in the manufacturi
." what happened, and who should pay the cost of cleaning up the environment? and what happened when the environmental protection agency orderes angeles to clean u, no matter what the cost? should we spend billio to mitigate climate change? or wait and see what really happens? since the late 1960s, ere has been a consens among americans that the air we breathe and the water we drink should meet certain standards of cleanliness. but, like most things of value, those standards come with a price tag attached. pollution -- how much is a clean environment worth? economic analyst richard gill and i willxamine that question on this edition of "economics usa." i'm david schoumacher. the united states has always been blessed with vast natural resources, including some things we used to take for granted, like fresh water and clean, healthy air. but not any longer. in the past few decades, we've learned that industrial activity carries with it a substantial environmental price tag. if we want fresher water and healthier air, somebody is going to have to pay for it, as we found in the tiny town
is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to as
of environment funds a staff person i don't think there's the same kind of public concern that anything the puc funds and anything the doe funds could be considered additional funding for our schools. but the children's fund is a large fund and i'd hate to see 7 million, 8 million, the maximum amount be considered new funding for the schools. i don't think that was the intent of the voters but i also understand we didn't specify that in the original prop h language and i look forward to having discussion around that. are there any other closing comments? all right, seeing none, can we take a motion to continue this item to the call of the chair? we have a motion, we can take that without objection. madam clerk, are there any other announcements? seeing none, the meeting is adjourned. thank you for your patience in sticking around. (meeting adjourned). >>> mayor lee is here with us today. i think it's very appropriate to reflect what we are celebrating here on the immense responsibilities that he and the administration have. mayor lee, i know i speak for all of us in expressing our deep gr
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
? -- stanford? i said, no, i want them to go back to east coast schools. it was just an academic environment i was used to since i was schooled on the east coast. now living there for nearly seven years it is unparalleled, the collaborative environment that stanford provides. it's so based in collaboration and students working together that professors actually have to document on their syllabus when students can't work together. and the interesting thing is not just this continued foresight of collaboration and this commitment towards science and now engineering and technology, but also how stanford works with the border, the surrounding community, but also works with the next generation of kids. the opportunity for k-12 kids starting with being nursery school is just remarkable that silicon valley kids are this additional advantage, i think, of being raised in the area irrespective of what their socioeconomic status is of having the exposure to the religion and support of entrepreneur hardship. and i think most kids who attend stanford university, young adults, have some desire to do some for
be completelytpid. based on nothing but our per accepting how they work. they have different media environment. there's a lightbulb. right. the lightbulb create an environment of light. we don't care about the content. there's no content in lightbulb until you put something in front of it and have words. a t create answer environment. air-conditioning creates an environment. television creates an environment. telegraph creates an environment. and digital technology creates an environment too. it's not the digital technology making it happen, but as our culture changes, we adopt digital tools. our values change, we change the tool we develop and the tools we develop change the way we see things. >> how much -- the difference between the culture around print and the internet. how many are inhesht to an environment of digital curlture and how much it's a new media and the past ten or twenty years is unregulated. it's wild rest. it's become less like that? >> it's interesting. , i mean, i have all felt like we are in danger of folding the digital media environment to the industrial age. that's bee
out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful
provocations and how to respond. >> translator: the security environment is becoming more challenging, strengthen being the alliance between japan and the united states is important for the peace and security of the region. >> they agreed the japanese and americans need to work more closely with the south koreans. they will fulfill their responsibilities under their security pact with japan. dempsey has also been talking with leaders in china. he said the chinese consider islands at the heart of a territorial dispute with japan a tough priority. japan controls the senkaku islands. china and japan claim them. >> they did use the term core interest. >> a spokes person for china's foreign ministry emphasized the chinese position using their name for the islands. >> translator: the islands are an issue of chinese sovereignty and authority. this pertains to chinese court interests. >> they have repeatedly used the term core interest to describe taiwan. diplomatic sources say they may be describing the islands the same way to show how seriously they take the dispute. >>> authorities in bang
in a competitive environment. they have taught me what it's like to be a professional in three months more than what my school has taught me what it's like to be a professional in two years. this is actually an opportunity that i had with bay cat and basically my piece represents the idea if you want to make changes for yourself, no matter how hard it is you have to go out there and take chance. i hope you enjoy the video. thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> we've save the other interest. i want to honor the other speakers. thank you jessica, if it does cue up, we'll let it play. many of you know bay cat as a very long history in working with youth and i think part of that outreach question for us has been building that pathway. so there are two pathways and techsf is one of those programs ultimately that i feel for the first time, bay cat is going to be ten years old next year. in developing these pathways. education to employment is part of our vision from the very beginning. it has taken 10 years to build a youth program in the beginning of that pathway starting with kids as young as 1
again setting the standard for exceptional livable urban environments. i don't know if standing here today is hard to conceive that san francisco is the urban environment here on the west coast. one reason it's hard to conceive how dense it is is because san francisco is ahead of the curve of making it a transit system. we have a simple subway to follow. san francisco is going to continue to lead the way forward both on transportation and on sustainable urban environments. without question we are going to see these forward looking transit projects continue to propel the economics projects of the city and it's live ability and vitality. what we are seeing here at 350 mission, that represents an important milestone in the fulfillment of that transit center vision. as most of you know, kilroy has been the most active investor in san francisco these days and bay area over the last few years and we've done so because we believe in this city and we've also done so because we have immense confidence in mayor lee. it's no coincidence that under mayor lee and his administration that we've see
, biology, physics, listening, cognitive, perception and social behavior and the environment. right here in san francisco. and it just does not happen in every city, but it will happen here. not only in san francisco, but for the families around the world. and the exporatorium does so much more for our san francisco communities. it offers our region's children and families 3,500 under served children and families will have free, science workshops. 70. yes. 70 under served middle high school students, opportunities to participate in college prep courses right here and training and hiring of over 200 of our city's youth, in docet jobs called explainers who will be warmly greeting you in front of the brand new station of the exporatorium of muni. [ applause ] >> so that is the function and the purpose of the exporatorium and let me tell you a little bit about how this place does even more than that. it provides public new access, public access to water-front sites for the first time in over 50 years. two, brand new acres of public accessible open space. access to our historic bulkhead at pi
in high school, i was only the follower so i was looking around my environment to see what actually there really was and all i would see is young adults getting into trouble and youth going into street and hustling and doing all this bad stuff and i thought that was the way i had to live because that's what i saw. doing that it almost caused me to leave school. i found this program called united players and they flipped my life around and gave me a different perspective from my choices. from there i started helping out youth and tried to make a difference and i'm happy to say that i graduated and from then on i continued with my college learning but then i notice i still didn't have that energy, that support, that focus. because i grew up with a large family, my parents were working hard and i didn't have that support and motivation. knowing that my son was going to be on the way, i had to take a big risk which is basically put school to the side and find a job where i can provide for my son. i found a friend in the program and from there on i put all my energy, all my focus. i was
punitive measures because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and
this thing is dead. stick a fork in it. i don't think it should be, but i think in this environment, no one wants to be in the front of the line saying, i got a legal immigration plan. i just don't think it's going to happen any time soon. >> well, neil, i found that over my many years of talking to you, that's my name dropping fors segment is that you are almost always right on these tactical political issues where it doesn't have anything to do with ideology. i'm sad to hear you say that. >> what's the rush in this environment? i don't want to look like i'm giving up on these things at all that neil's panelists were talking about. >> i think you're right. the reason i say i'm sad, pandering, we -- politics is pappedderring. -- pandering. that's a given. but we're not rushing here. we've been trying to do immigration reform since president george w. bush tried and failed because his party wouldn't support him on this. >> actually we did that to ronald reagan and rouxed the day because ronald reagan said he was hood winked. >> what we can say on this program because we're not politicians is
of which are planning to continue to burning massive amounts of carbon into the environment, but rather ensure the safety of the communities and promote renewable alternatives. the city should be making investments consistent with the cleaner plan, support the public good. our pension fund should divest fossil fuels polluting our environment . invest in the energy sources of the future again thank you to supervisor avalos and the many richmond district residents and people throughout the city who have supported this. >> president chiu: supervisor cohen. >> supervisor cohen: as a public service announcement i want to bring attention that i am the board appointee to the san francisco retirement board. i will continue to carry your wishes on this board but i wanted to manage the expectations that this is a nonbinding resolution; a statement of this body asking and urging the retirement board, of which there are six other members to take this under consideration and also want to know is that there is a very thoughtful, but fairly long and drawnout process, the divestment process to begin t
and meanders under a canopy of oaks yup lipid u.s. and chill out in this pleasant and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 >> we came to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has t
are accommodating growth in a manner that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm v
devices work in different periods. but they did a different what we call media environments are there different media environment. there's a light bulb, right, a light bulb creates an environment of light. we don't care about the content. there's no content in the label and tell you put, negative words. but the lightbulb itself creates an environment. air-conditioning is a technology that creates an environment. fire creates an environment. television creates an environment. telegraph creates an environment. and digital technology creates an environment, too, but without being too technical determined about it, as our culture changes we a top digital tools. our values change. would change the tools that we give up and then those tools that we develop to change the way we thing -- the way we see things. in the back. >> how much, by cursing differences between the culture around print, how many of these things are apparent to environment of the digital culture how much, it's a new media and is then unregulated and it's been a wild, wild west and you see it less like that? >> i
with a better environment. so, for example, we enrich the environment of 3-year-old children by giving them better nutrition, more physical exercise and a cognitive stimulation for two years from age 3 to 5. that resulted in better brain functioning at age 11 and a 35% reduction in criminal offending at age 23. so it's not biology by itself. it's not a social environment by itself. it's the mix of them coming together that conspire to create the violent offender. >> if everyone is out there measuring their heart rate or something it's not that simple. >> not as simple as that. i have a low resting heart rate, too. >> my thanks again to adrian raine for joining us. fascinating stuff. >>> still ahead on sgmd, see what tv's sherlock holmes is doing to help scientists find real clues to cure a rare disease before it's too late. gn we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. [ agent smith ] i've found soft
pieces fit, both in terms of the environment and then economically and operationally, is not easy. >> a mine in this area is very complicated. there are a lot of moving parts, and you have to really look at every one of those closely. >> narrator: ken taylor is a wildlife biologist who is in charge of pebble's environmental studies. >> if we can't coexist with the fishery, then we shouldn't build the mine, because fish are really important to the people out here. and we have focused a lot of our environmental baseline studies on fish and fish habitat. our water quality studies have been extremely intense. far more than any other mine or oil and gas development project has done in alaska in the past. >> narrator: taylor believes that the waters near the mine site are not a very important part of the salmon habitat. >> the area that we are likely to impact if this mine goes forward is not a very productive part of bristol bay in and of itself. it's a very small part of the headwaters that typically freeze solid during the wintertime. >> oh, there's a little jack! >> narrator: tom qu
to safely navigates the environment. we've taken particular notice of the youth advocates who have registered their support of officer safety as well their omission to rearming probation officers. i want to thank supervisor campos at the outset of his presentation and remarks making mention of the process the department has made in terms of evidence based practices and the focus of our work. >> but we do need to make a presentation that follows defense attorneys the requests that's made at the agenda that's old in the agenda that we're going to focus on the core peace officer responsibilities by holding the highest risk chronic reresidency offenders while released into the communities court jurisdiction. i'm happy to introduce my colleague to share a presentation. chief. >> thank you very much for the introduction. i have a fairly comprehensive power point prevention i'd like to make. good afternoon supervisors and a members of the public and those viewing at home. i'm the assistant chief officer of the department and i intended to share with you our department prevention regardi
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪
are on a park and that creates a great environment for the people who can live and work in this location, it feels like an urban campus environment and again, there say great precedence with washington square and jackson square and the best in new york with bryant park in the middle of manhattan, which is the home to a lot of activities and the people go there every day and it is almost a tourist attraction in and of itself. >> and this slide is an interesting one it comes from copenhagen in denmark and shows how housing can interact with the park. so that the people that are in the housing feel like they are in the park and the people that are in the park see the people living there and creates a incredible diverse and interesting environment. >> so jack mentioned how the parks and open space are going to create a central hub for the bay and water front neighborhoods and we feel the same way about the retail and the importance of the place making in the retail and the streetscape. and at pier 48 it will be the first step in creating the experience for the pedestrians but importantly, an
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
is good for the environment. >> i consider myself a leader in being a friend of the environment. >> this is the most unusual and uncomfortable situation to be in when environmentalists are at odds with environmentalists. >> reporter: a bill now before congress could save the oyster farm, but it would also open more coastline to another business, oil drilling. both sides worry, for the environment, that is a raw deal. >> they've introduced legislation that are sort of environmental wrecking balls. >> they're using our poor little oyster farm. they're using these people. it's... i think it's unconscionable. >> reporter: it's a battle threatening to leave everyone shell-shocked. john blackstone, cbs news, san francisco. >> axelrod: next up, security concerns in the aftermath of the bombings in boston. teenagers there question just how safe they really are. e the . marathon bombs, it had been nearly 12 years since the last major terrorist attack on u.s. soil. among the fallout from the attacks, the question many americans are asking once again-- just how safe are we? dn with members
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
to pass comprehensive legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 631 (some duplicates have been removed)